Swiss Bliss Day 6 (Part 2)

If you want to know how healthy you are, just take a look around you when you go around the hikes in Switzerland. Most of the people you will meet are around the late 40s to the early 60s. Not to mention a few other older age groups.

“That’s how healthy the Swiss are,” I said.

“Something to aspire to when we get back home,” said Dad.

I chose this particular hike because of its relative ease, all downhill and also for the view. Although we would find out more about the latter as we go along.

This is a reminder how high we are. (click to enlarge)

This is a reminder how high we are. (click to enlarge)

After warming up and taking a couple of photos at the top, we are ready to start our journey. Not to worry about the lack of participants, you will soon find out that there are a lot of fellow hikers along the way. In both directions.

A sampling.

A sampling.

The trail is mostly flat and hugging the hillside. You can see below you and also above you if you want. For those who are afraid of heights, you could always try to stay in the inner path. Good comfortable shoes is a must because it is mostly gravel. This hike would take up around two hours of your time. This includes stopping for rest and photo shoots. For the healthier readers, maybe you could cut it down to an hour and a half but no more, otherwise you would have missed out on some of the spectacular views along the way.

It is a flat trail hugging the hillside for most of the two-hour trek downhill.

Signpost

Signpost

“At the start of the journey, we will be seeing more of Grindelwald, before we loop back to face the Jungfrau.” I told the rest.

“Looks like the clouds are already coming in,” said the wife.

Cloudy (click to enlarge)

Cloudy (click to enlarge)

Along the way, there are places in which you could stop and give your feet a rest. Just bring along plenty of water, although you won’t be sweating much, it still takes a toll on the body.

The biggest rest area lies facing the Jungfrau. And you will recognize it immediately as there are plenty of benches facing the mountains and most people would have a picnic there. Unfortunately, our day was marred by clouds and more clouds.

Our destination, Kleine Scheidegg is a stopover for those on the trail and also for those going to the Jungfrau. It is also a place catering to tourists. We finally arrived there after a 2-hour journey.

Kleine Scheidegg

Kleine Scheidegg

Because of the cold weather, we are 6000ft above sea level. This is a nice place to enjoy the famous rösti. There are plenty of eateries around the area but there is only one that stood out from the rest.

Restaurant Eiger Nordwand

Located slightly away from Kleine Scheidegg but much closer to us coming down from the hike lies Restaurant Eiger Nordwand. According to the locals and also from a friend I found on TripAdvisor who had been travelling to the Bernese Oberland for the most part of the last decade, she suggested this place.

The best rösti can be found at Restaurant Eiger Nordwand

I think I’ll let the photos do the talking:

Rösti with an egg

Rösti with an egg

Rosti with an egg from the top

Rosti with an egg from the top

Half of a rosti

Half of a rosti

The rösti is a dish made up of potatoes, fried and mixed with a variety of toppings, although my favourite seems to be the common one with an egg on top. The closest thing that I could describe this would be that the rösti is a bigger version of the hash brown. And so much better although if you can see clearly in the photos above, it does come with a huge amount of oil.

Having had our first taste of the Wanderweg, the rösti was more than enough to fuel our bodies for the rest of the day.

View from the restaurant

View from the restaurant

(to be continued)

 

 

 

 

 

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